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What I’m Reading Archive

Sunday

17

September 2017

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COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – September 17, 2017

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Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Action

“Title III of the ADA creates a proactive duty on businesses to remove architectural barriers and other obstacles that impede access to the establishment. But businesses have resisted making such changes for decades. And, now, they are asking Congress to help them. A harmful new bill in the House of Representatives, the so-called ADA Education and Reform Act of 2017 (H.R. 620), is gaining steam. It will be debated in the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday morning and may go to House floor for a vote soon thereafter.” Congress Wants to Change the Americans With Disabilities Act and Undermine the Civil Rights of People With Disabilities (by Tyler Ray and Vania Leveille for ACLU)

Racism

“Stone Chaney, who attends East Middle School in Farmington Hills, Mich., told ClickOnDetroit that his teacher “violently” dragged him out of his chair and attempted to force him to stand for the pledge, leaving the young man confused and unwilling to return to that school. “The teacher consultant comes up behind me and snatches me out of my chair violently,” Stone told the news site. “I was so confused. I didn’t know what was going on.”” Mich. Teacher ‘Violently’ Drags Black 6th-Grader Out of His Seat After He Declines to Stand for the Pledge of Allegiance: Report (by Breanna Edwards for The Root)

“Here’s a riddle for you: Three young black men are walking alongside a Louisiana road when they get hit by a passing vehicle. Who gets charged? If you guessed “the driver, of course, duh,” then you guessed wrong, because apparently nothing makes sense anymore.” 3 Young Black Men Were Hit by a Motorist While Walking Along a Road in La. Guess Who Got Charged? (by Breanna Edwards for The Root)

Cultural Appropriation

“Within months, Polow flew Iggy from Atlanta to LA. For a few weeks, she shadowed him in the studio, meeting icons like Timbaland and Dr. Dre and superstars like Chris Brown, who saw her and, according to Polow, wondered, “Who the fuck is that?” By then, Iggy had cycled through a series of mentors who pushed her toward pop. They also taught her how to rap. Polow was just about last in the lineup before she met T.I., the rap star who would help her create the “super hood shit” Polow says she envisioned.” The Making and Unmaking of Iggy Azalea (by Clover Hope for Jezebel)

Violence Against the Trans Community

“Like Banner, most of the trans people who have been murdered this year were black trans women. They were found dead in cars, in garages, outside shopping centers, and on rural roads. Last year, 27 transgender people were murdered, most of whom were overwhelmingly women of color. It was the deadliest year on record for transgender people.” 20 transgender people have been killed this year (by Casey Quinlan for Think Progress)

Reproductive Health

“Twelve years later, she’s still waiting to have what’s often considered the most effective surgery to treat endometriosis—the delay a result of a long path to diagnosis and, now, lack of insurance coverage for the procedure that would give her the best chance for less debilitating pain. Gibbons has taken up to 20 Advil per day—more than the recommended maximum—to manage the condition.” For Those With Endometriosis, Lack of Access to Surgical Option Compounds the Pain (by Nadra Nittle for Rewire)

Hurricane Response

“Employees at the Florida nursing home where eight residents died in sweltering heat after Hurricane Irma called an emergency cell phone in the governor’s office multiple times as the temperature inside the facility soared, officials said Friday. The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills claimed in a timeline provided to CBS Miami that staff members called Florida Power & Light and the governor’s office multiple times starting on Sept. 10, but failed to receive help until three days later, when patients were already having medical emergencies.” Nursing Home Where 8 Residents Died After Irma Had Called Governor’s Office For Help (by Mary Ann Georgantopoulos, Brianna Sacks, and Blake Montgomery for Buzzfeed)

“Fortunately, there are organizations whose focus is to provide assistance to communities of color and other groups that are disproportionately vulnerable in times of tragedy. Here, a partial list.” How to Donate Money and Other Aid to Communities of Color in Houston (by Ayana Byrd for Colorlines)

Cool Thing of the Week

Lighting “Insecure” 

Sunday

10

September 2017

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COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – September 10, 2017

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Horrific Executive, Legislative, or Judicial Action

“A not so fun fact about what Donald Rumsfeld once called “known unknowns”: ICE doesn’t know or won’t say how many American citizens have been arrested and imprisoned by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. It’s illegal for ICE to imprison Americans, but so long as its agents don’t believe you are one, the burden is on you to prove it—without being entitled to a lawyer, since most deportation hearings are civil proceedings.” ICE Wrongly Imprisoned an American Citizen for 1,273 Days. Judges Say He’s Owed $0. (by Harry Siegel for The Daily Beast)

“First: Sessions claimed that DACA “contributed to a surge of unaccompanied minors on the southern border.” This allegation, often touted by far-right xenophobes, is false. A study published in International Migration, a peer-reviewed academic journal, found that the surge in unaccompanied minors actually began in 2008. (DACA was announced in 2012.) The authors pointed to a host of factors contributing to this phenomenon, including escalating gang violence in Central America, as well as drug cartels’ willingness to target and recruit children in Mexico. But the study found that DACA was not one of these factors. Its authors concluded that “the claim that DACA is responsible for the increase in the flow of unaccompanied alien children is not supported by the data.”” Jeff Sessions Spews Nativist Lies While Explaining Why Trump Is Killing DACA (by  Mark Joseph Stern for Slate)

“Funding for this work quite often features the US government. US global health funding has topped $10bn in each of the past three years. But all that is now at risk, after President Donald Trump’s decision to reinstate the so-called Global Gag rule, which will ban funding to any non-US aid groups that offer abortion services or advice funded from other partners.” Insult to injury: how Trump’s ‘global gag’ will hit women traumatised by war (by Tara Sutton, Joe Parkin Daniels, and Ruth Maclean for The Guardian)

Sports

“Let me say why this was such an exceptionally brave thing to do. One, it’s always courageous to tell the truth when you are bullied or beaten. If you hold that inside, it can kill you. You tell the truth and shame the devil. Two, we know what kind of reaction a statement like this can provoke in the police. Rather than apologizing to Michael Bennett, they will interpret this as an attack on all of them. That, to me, is the sickest part of police culture. Not every police officer brutalizes people, but the overwhelming number of police officers will protect those who do. It’s called “the blue line of silence” for a reason.” Stand With Michael Bennett, Even if It’s Uncomfortable (by Dave Zirin for The Nation)

Corporate Irresponsibility

“So, Equifax, I have to ask: Now that you have failed at your one job, why should you be allowed to keep doing it? If a bank lost everyone’s money, regulators might try to shut down the bank. If an accounting firm kept shoddy books, its licenses to practice accounting could be revoked. (See how Texas pulled Arthur Andersen’s license after the Enron debacle.) So if a data-storage credit agency loses pretty much everyone’s data, why should it be allowed to store anyone’s data any longer? Seriously, Equifax? This Is a Breach No One Should Get Away With (by Farhad Manjoo for The New York Times)

“Gamble sold more than 13 percent of his stake in Equifax. Loughran sold 9 percent of his holdings and Ploder disposed of 4 percent. Equifax said in its statement that intruders accessed names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and driver’s-license numbers, as well as credit-card numbers for about 209,000 consumers. The incident ranks among the largest cybersecurity breaches in history.” Three Equifax Managers Sold Stock Before Cyber Hack Revealed (by Anders Merlin for Bloomberg)

“The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end. Ms. Evans was a full-time employee of Kodak. She received more than four weeks of paid vacation per year, reimbursement of some tuition costs to go to college part time, and a bonus payment every March. When the facility she cleaned was shut down, the company found another job for her: cutting film. Ms. Ramos is an employee of a contractor that Apple uses to keep its facilities clean. She hasn’t taken a vacation in years, because she can’t afford the lost wages. Going back to school is similarly out of reach. There are certainly no bonuses, nor even a remote possibility of being transferred to some other role at Apple.” To Understand Rising Inequality, Consider the Janitors at Two Top Companies, Then and Now (by Neil Irwin for The New York Times)

Justice

“When you enjoy your freedoms, and you tell those who want their freedoms that they have to wait, that they have to go slowly, that they have to give you time to make uncomfortable adjustments to the amount of privilege that their inequality has afforded you, what you are saying is, “You were not born with these rights. You were not born as deserving as me. I have the power and privilege to determine when it is time for you to receive freedom and equality, and my approval is conditioned on how comfortable and safe you make me feel about how that freedom and equality will impact the privileges I enjoy.”” There Is No Middle Ground Between Racism And Justice (by Ijeoma Oluo for The Establishment)

Fight Back

“When I forwarded Elliot’s message to his listed family members on Facebook, hoping that someone, anyone, would do a single goddamned thing about their son or uncle or cousin who reads Neo-Nazi blogs and fantasizes about raping and murdering women he disagrees with politically, one defended him as “excitable.” As if he were a badly behaved Pomeranian prone to pissing on the rug and telling women that they will be raped, murdered and set on fire when guys like him take charge.” Is Doxxing Ever Okay? (by Andrea Grimes for Dame)

Sunday

27

August 2017

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COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – August 27, 2017

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Today I’m mostly focused on the response to Hurricane Harvey. If you are so moved, Huffington Post has a round-up of donation options. As always, do your own research. And with natural disasters, the need is LONG TERM. So if you can’t give right now, please consider giving in a couple of months, or next year even. These folks will need our help for years.

Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary Action

“But professor Martin Redish argues in the New York Times that this particular pardon ought to be deemed constitutionally invalid. He contends that it offends the Due Process Clause because the only effective redress for those whose rights were violated by then–Sheriff Arpaio when he defied the court’s injunction is a contempt sanction, and voiding that sanction with a pardon both neuters the judicial power to enforce constitutional rights and deprives Arpaio’s victims of relief.” Trump’s Pardon of Joe Arpaio Is an Impeachable Offense (by Frank Bowman for Slate)

“Overseeing the process was Judge Linda R. Reade, the chief judge of the Northern District of Iowa. She defended the decision to turn a fairground into a courthouse, saying the proceedings were fair and unhurried. The incident sparked allegations of prosecutorial and judicial misconduct and led to congressional hearings. Erik Camayd-Freixas, an interpreter who had worked at the Waterloo proceedings, testified that most of the Spanish-speaking defendants had been pressured to plead guilty. Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) said the unconventional process seemed “like a cattle auction, not a criminal prosecution in the United States of America.”” A Federal Judge Put Hundreds of Immigrants Behind Bars While Her Husband Invested in Private Prisons (by Samantha Michaels for Mother Jones)

Disaster

“In an interview on Sunday morning, Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman for the National Hurricane Center, said: “Everything that we had hoped wouldn’t happen but was forecasted is happening. We have a catastrophic, life-threatening flood event taking place over southeastern Texas, including the Houston metropolitan area. It’s bad now and it’s getting worse.”” Harvey Brings Catastrophic Floods to Houston; at Least Five Reported Dead (New  York Times)

““The Right to be Rescued” is a short documentary that tells the stories of people with disabilities affected by Hurricane Katrina. Released days before the 10th anniversary of the storm, our goal is to make emergency planners aware of the specific needs of people with disabilities and push them to alter their disaster plans to make sure those needs are met. You can help! We will provide links or DVDs to anyone who would like to screen this film for emergency planners and others in their community.” The Right to be Rescued (by Rooted in Rights)

Reproductive Health

“Richardson’s case has also attracted national attention from advocates who note that it bears some resemblance to that of Purvi Patel’s, the Indiana woman who was arrested after prosecutors said she delivered a live fetus following taking abortion-inducing drugs obtained from the internet. Patel was ordered to serve 20 years in prison for feticide and felony neglect of a dependent in 2016. After an appeal, the feticide charge was overturned and the neglect charge was reduced last year.” Trial Date Set for Ohio Woman Accused of Killing Baby After Reporting Stillbirth (by Sonia Chopra for Rewire)

Policing

““I shouted out begging for their help,” Kendall said, “telling them, ‘The man who hit me, he’s walking away right now, I can see him, please help me. I need your help …. I would say two of the officers had the courage to meet my gaze. Most of them averted their eyes. All of them did nothing. None of them said a word.”” In Charlottesville, ‘Police Did Nothing’ (by Jackson Landers for Rewire)

Sunday

20

August 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – August 20, 2017

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Horrific Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Action

“Yet even if all 1,500 Confederate symbols across the country were removed overnight by some sudden supernatural force, the pernicious crusade to roll back voting rights would continue apace, with voters of color suffering its effects disproportionately. Pushing back hard against those who would purge voter rolls, demand forms of voter ID that many Americans don’t possess, and limit times and venues for voting — this should be a paramount cause for the Trump era.” Voter suppression is the civil rights issue of this era (by the Editorial Board of the Washington Post)

“Desperate, Arias hired an attorney to help him pursue the injury benefits that Florida law says all employees, including unauthorized immigrants, are entitled to receive. Then one morning after he dropped off two of his boys at school, Arias was pulled over and arrested, while his toddler watched from his car seat. Arias was charged with using a false Social Security number to get a job and to file for workers’ comp. The state insurance fraud unit had been tipped off by a private investigator hired by his employer’s insurance company.” They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported (by Michael Grabell for NPR)

““What we have is a sweeping request for every single file we have” in relation to DisruptJ20.org, said Chris Ghazarian, general counsel for DreamHost, which hosts the site. “The search warrant is not only dealing with everything in relation to the website but also tons of data about people who visited it.” The request also covers emails between the site’s organizers and people interested in attending the protests, any deleted messages and files, as well as subscriber information — such as names and addresses — and unpublished photos and blog posts that are stored in the site’s database, according to the warrant and Ghazarian.” Tech firm is fighting a federal demand for data on visitors to an anti-Trump website (by Ellen Nakashima for Washington Post)

“But not everyone agrees with that statement. State lawmakers in at least six GOP-controlled states have pushed for laws this year that would shield drivers who hit protesters. The bills are part of a wave of anti-protest proposals introduced since the rise of the Black Lives Matter and anti-Trump resistance movements.” Republicans in 6 states are trying to protect drivers who hit protesters (by Kira Lerner for Think Progress)

White Supremacy

“But turnout on the white supremacist side was incredibly small. They were outnumbered, by the thousands, by counter-protestors, who flooded Boston Common and the surrounding streets to rally against neo-Nazis, the KKK, and racist violence.” White supremacist rally fizzles, overtaken by massive anti-racism march (by Jessica M. Goldstein for Think Progress)

“Over time, I noticed that her opinions and politics began to skew right. Or at least, her rhetoric sounded as such. She often questioned my rage at injustices in society. Not so much the instances that annoyed me, but my belief that America, as an institution, was at fault. She preferred to believe that there were just bad apples out there making bad choices. My issues were isolated, not systemic. No matter how I presented my case, she always found a way to insinuate that maybe it wasn’t as bad as I was making it out to be and that everything wasn’t about race. These conversations always frustrated me because I couldn’t understand how anybody who watched the news, and then heard her own flesh and blood speak passionately about his own experiences, could doubt with so much conviction.” How Trump Ruined My Relationship With My White Mother (by Panama Jackson for The Root)

“The ACLU’s Virginia branch defended the right of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other groups under the banner “Unite the Right” to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a Charlottesville park. “The events of Charlottesville require any judge, any police chief and any legal group to look at the facts of any white-supremacy protests with a much finer comb,” said Mr. Romero. The revised policy marries the 97-year-old civil-rights group’s First Amendment work with the organization’s stance on firearms, which aligns with many municipalities and states that bar protesters from carrying weapons.” ACLU Will No Longer Defend Hate Groups Protesting With Firearms (by Joe Palazzolo for the Wall Street Journal)

“But while the president may have muddied the waters for those who were not present on those Virginia streets last weekend, the protesters, reporters, and clergy present understand the true character of the chaos: violence on Friday night, with police asleep at the switch, led to an uneasy atmosphere Saturday morning. Police again played the bystander’s role the next morning, fanning a tense morning into a bloody afternoon of pitched battles in the public street.” The police failed Charlottesville (via Alan Pike for Think Progress)

“Online, white nationalists may use pseudonyms, VPNs, and other techniques to try to mask their identity out of fear of doxxing, or having their personal, sensitive information leaked online. But at Charlottesville, those who attended had no reasonable expectation of privacy, according to the organizers themselves.” Doxxing White Supremacists Is Making Them Terrified (by Steven Blum for Broadly)

“The torch bearers who descended upon Charlottesville this past weekend to protest the removal of a statue honoring Lee appear young enough to have attended grade school after the separation, but it’s clear they received the same message. In Lee, they see a hero. Not only do they see a hero, they see themselves. The chant that animated their march was, “You will not replace us.” More than 150 years after the end of Civil War, they choose to identify with those who took up arms in order to maintain holding people in bondage. I wish I found this more surprising.” Historical Amnesia About Slavery Is a Tool of White Supremacy (by Mychal Denzel Smith for The Nation)

“But these right-wing extremists are the same group that helped put Donald Trump into office, aligning with his discriminatory, socially regressive agenda. According to The New York Times, David Duke, a former imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, told reporters on Saturday that the protesters were “going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump” to “take our country back.” So it’s no wonder why we’ve seen Donald Trump focus his agenda almost entirely on countering Islamist extremism while skirting around white supremacist extremism.” Right Wing Terrorism in America (by Hannah Rose for Bust)

““Me and about five of my friends were out protesting. We thought [the racists] left, but at one point they came back. Everyone was exchanging words with the group, but then the KKK and white supremacists just rushed us,” Harris told The Root in an interview. “They were beating me with poles. I have eight staples in my head, a broken wrist and a chipped tooth,” Harris said.” Interview: 20-Year-Old Deandre Harris Speaks Out About Being Assaulted by White Supremacists in Charlottesville, Va. (by Yesha Callahan for The Root)

“The road that James Alex Fields Jr. sped down was paved with countless editorials in major newspapers and magazines that positioned student movements or black women on Twitter as existential threats to “free speech.” It was paved by those who said they were less afraid of Richard Spencer than the man who punched him. It was paved by countless people saying, “they’re just words” or “it’s just the internet, it’s not real life” in defence of extremists’ vitriol, never realizing that such statements are not mere words on the wind: they are promises.” When ‘Free Speech’ Kills (by Katherine Cross for The Establishment)

Fight Back

“”Find what’s wrong, don’t ignore it, don’t look the other way,” Bro said. “Say to yourself, ‘What can I do to make a difference?’ And that’s how you’re going to make my child’s death worthwhile.” “I want this to spread. I don’t want this to die. This is just the beginning of Heather’s legacy,” she continued.” The mother of Heather Heyer, Charlottesville victim, just gave a must-watch speech. (by Parker Molloy for Upworthy)

“Our country’s entire social, political, and economic system is built off of the promise that poor and working class whites would always get more than everyone else — that they deserved more than everyone else. When the profits of white supremacy prove to be meager, because capitalism will always send the spoils to the top few, the anger of being cheated out of their just rewards is easily funneled into racist hate.” So You Want To Fight White Supremacy (by Ijeoma Oluo for The Establishment)

“Dozens of NYPD officers joined Raymond in wearing black shirts with the logo “#ImWithKap.” City Council member Jumaane Williams opted for a red Kaepernick jersey. Near the end of the rally, all involved raised their fists and took a synchronized knee in support of the one-time San Francisco starter.” Frank Serpico, NYPD cops raise their fists, take a knee for team-less Colin Kaepernick at Brooklyn rally (by Dale W. Eisinger and Larry McShane for NY Daily News)

“In his defense of terrorist extremist factions, the president also lumped in the anti-fascist (or “antifa”) movement. While many are familiar with the various segments of white supremacy, few people have taken the time to explain the origins and motivations of the antifa movement that recently stepped into the spotlight, so we thought we’d offer this explainer.” Yes, Anti-Fascists Are Violent … and Necessary (by Michael Harriot for The Root)

Something Good

“Farooq Aftab, the event organiser and the deputy head of AMYA, told The Independent the location was important because it showed Muslims were engaged in public life across the UK, despite the area itself not being particularly diverse. “We recognise Islam as a religion of peace and integration which promotes unity and this is what this event will show. We want to make sure that we bring people together and that we show unity and humanity,” he said, adding the event will help to fight “misconceptions about Islam”. The event’s motto “every act of goodness is charity” is a message of the Prophet Muhammad who according to Muslims encouraged charitable actions towards others.” Muslim youth group combating Islamophobia by raising £500,000 for charity with single event (by Chloe Farand for The Independent)

Sunday

13

August 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – August 13, 2017

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White Supremacist Violence

“The city of Charlottesville was engulfed by violence on Saturday as white nationalists and counterprotesters clashed in one of the bloodiest fights to date over the removal of Confederate monuments across the South. White nationalists had long planned a demonstration over the city’s decision to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. But the rally quickly exploded into racial taunting, shoving and outright brawling, prompting the governor to declare a state of emergency and the National Guard to join the police in clearing the area.” Man Charged After White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville Ends in Deadly Violence (by Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Brian M. Rosenthal for New York Times)

“Standing nearby, an assortment of Virginia State Police troopers and Charlottesville police wearing protective gear watched silently from behind an array of metal barricades — and did nothing. It was a scene that played out over and over in Charlottesville as law enforcement confronted the largest public gathering of white supremacists in decades. We walked the streets beginning in the early morning hours and repeatedly witnessed instances in which authorities took a largely laissez faire approach, allowing white supremacists and counter-protesters to physically battle.” Police Stood By As Mayhem Mounted in Charlottesville (by A.C. Thompson and Robert Faturechi for ProPublica)

“The US President has refused to condemn the actions of the neo-Nazis, skinheads, and members of the Ku Klux Klan who descended on the Virginia city on Saturday yelling racial abuse, brandishing flaming torches, carrying assault rifles and wearing paramilitary clothing. Speaking from a stage in a golf clubhouse, President Trump decried “violence on all sides” rather than explicitly taking aim at far-right extremists.” Neo-Nazis and White Supremacists applaud Donald Trump’s response to deadly violence in Virginia (by Maya Oppenheim for The Independent)

“Heather Heyer’s mother, Susan Bro, told HuffPost that her daughter attended Saturday’s rally because she “was about bringing an end to injustice.” “Heather was not about hate, Heather was about stopping hatred,” Bro said through tears. “Heather was about bringing an end to injustice. I don’t want her death to be a focus for more hatred, I want her death to be a rallying cry for justice and equality and fairness and compassion.”” Heather Heyer ‘Murdered While Protesting Against Hate’ In Charlottesville, Friends Say (by Dominique Mosbergen , Andy Campbell for Huffpost)

Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Actions

“The Indiana chapter of the NAACP is suing state election officials to block a new law that would shutter hundreds of polling locations in a county with a large number of African American and Hispanic voters. The lawsuit, filed in federal court Wednesday, alleges that the law specifically targets a particular region of the state with a large minority, poor, and elderly population, impeding the ability of those voters to cast a ballot.” Indiana Is Making It Harder for Minorities to Vote, Lawsuit Alleges (by Pema Levy for Mother Jones)

Misogyny

“The manifesto expresses thoughts, beliefs and attitudes that are common to its author, Lépine, Rodger, and the domestic abusers Bancroft describes. It is written from a place of entitlement: like Lépine and Rodger but unlike some of the domestic abusers, the entitlement is not to just one specific woman’s attention and service, but rather, to special privileges as white men and to submission and deference from all women, and all people of color, and everybody else occupying a lower position in the social hierarchy. Like Lépine, he’s concerned that they’re taking our jobs.” Refusing to Empathize with Elliot Rodger: Taking Male Entitlement Seriously (by Tim Chevalier)

Sports

“Through it all Colin Kaepernick has remained silent. In his silence he has raised yet another mirror to reveal another ugly truth about another American institution. What’s left reflected is that Colin Kaepernick isn’t being blackballed because he knelt for the national anthem, he’s being blackballed because the NFL has (for decades) persuaded its patrons that what he is doesn’t exist: a three-dimensional, wholly human Black athlete.” Colin Kaepernick Isn’t Being Blackballed Because He Knelt for the Anthem (by André Carlisle)

“For many years, athletes have constantly been given additional chances because they are athletes. What does this say about rape culture? That athletes can do no wrong, that they can get away with anything because of how they perform on the field or in the gym?” the petition says. “Does he deserve a second chance? Yes, he does, and he is receiving that second chance by furthering his education on YSU’s campus. Does he deserve the privilege of playing on a football team and representing a university? Absolutely not. Education is a right, whereas playing on a sports team is not.” Athlete With a Past (by Scott Jaschik for Inside Higher Ed)

Criminal Punishment System

“Remote video calls will also be possible. Like phone calls from the jail, the visitors will be charged for video calls. Correctional officials said the fees have yet to be determined. The house of corrections is the first in the state to opt for video over in-person visits.” Massachusetts jail ending in-person visits, to only allow video calls (by Michelle Williams for Mass Live)

Xenophobia

“A quick look through PDC filings revealed that the biggest funders of Respect Washington, the group behind the repeal petition, is US Inc., an organization founded by John Tanton. Tanton—dubbed the “racist architect of the modern anti-immigration movement” by the Southern Poverty Law Center—and his organizations have been funding anti-immigrant activism and publishing white nationalist and white supremacist literature for decades.” Meet the Michigan-Based Anti-Immigrant Group Backing Burien’s Sanctuary City Repeal (by Sydney Brownstone for The Stranger)

Sexual Predators

“The fact remains that Allen is still a celebrated artist. His films appear at major festivals and are showered with awards, so if you’re an actor who wants those accolades, you’ll jump at the chance to work for him. You will even find an easy way to explain your reason for doing so.” Why Do Young Stars Like Selena Gomez Work With Woody Allen? (by Ira Madison III for The Daily Beast)

Health

“But it quickly became clear that “clean eating” was more than a diet; it was a belief system, which propagated the idea that the way most people eat is not simply fattening, but impure. Seemingly out of nowhere, a whole universe of coconut oil, dubious promises and spiralised courgettes has emerged. Back in the distant mists of 2009, James Duigan, owner of The Bodyism gym in London and sometime personal trainer to the model Elle MacPherson, published his first Clean and Lean book. As an early adopter of #eatclean, Duigan notes that he “battled” with his publisher “to include ingredients like kale and quinoa, because no one had ever heard of them”. Now quinoa is in every supermarket and kale has become as normal as lettuce. “I long for the days when clean eating meant not getting too much down your front,” the novelist Susie Boyt joked recently.” Why we fell for clean eating (by Bee Wilson for The Guardian)

Sunday

6

August 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – August 6, 2017

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Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary Action

““Passage of this bill would be a major step toward rationalizing and modernizing the federal immigration program,” Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the right-leaning policy organization Center for Immigration Studies, told ThinkProgress in an exchange over Twitter. “It does this in two major ways, first, it reserves special immigration rights only for husbands, wives, and young children of residents. Second, it cleans up our tangle of employment-based immigration categories by creating a streamlined points system designed to select exceptional talents.”” Republican senators introduce bill sharply limiting legal immigration (by Esther Yu Hsi Lee for Think Progress)

Racism

“That so many of these policies are based on perception and lies rather than reality is nothing new. White resentment has long thrived on the fantasy of being under siege and having to fight back, as the mass lynchings and destruction of thriving, politically active black communities in Colfax, La. (1873), Wilmington, N.C. (1898), Ocoee, Fla. (1920), and Tulsa, Okla. (1921), attest. White resentment needs the boogeyman of job-taking, maiden-ravaging, tax-evading, criminally inclined others to justify the policies that thwart the upward mobility and success of people of color.” The Policies of White Resentment (by Carol Anderson for The New York Times)

““The NAACP is a membership-based advocacy organization that has worked for generations to protect the hard-fought freedoms of all American citizens—freedoms which are guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution—and one of the most basic of those freedoms is the ability to freely travel from state-to-state without fear of threat, violence or harm,” said Derrick Johnson, interim president and CEO. “The numerous racist incidents, and the statistics cited by the Missouri Attorney General in the advisory, namely the fact that African Americans in Missouri are 75 percent more likely to be stopped and searched by law enforcement officers than Caucasians, are unconscionable, and are simply unacceptable in a progressive society.” Travel Advisory for the State Missouri

Workplace Culture

“The person who wrote the document argued that the representation gap between men and women in software engineering persists because of biological differences between the two sexes, according to public tweets from Google employees. It also said Google should not offer programs for underrepresented racial or gender minorities, according to one of the employees I spoke to.” Google Employee’s Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes ‘Internally Viral’ (by Louise Matsakis for Motherboard)

Transphobia

“The hosts laugh after using my image as a literal prop — just days after I was a guest on the same show — for laughs, vitriol, and a deeper call and justification for violence. Just so we are all clear: On a black program that often advocates for the safety and lives of black people, its hosts laughed as their guest advocated for the murder of black trans women who are black people, too!” Dear Men of “The Breakfast Club”: Trans Women Aren’t a Prop, Ploy, or Sexual Predators (by Janet Mock for Allure)

Sexual Abuse

““We aren’t investigators,” Dispenza continued, “but when several allegations or accusations are raised against a prominent leader, we can’t remain silent. We do believe that Mayor Ed Murray needs to resign—and do it now.” SNAP’s national organization, which counts 20,000 members, stood behind the call for Murray’s resignation, said Dispenza, herself the survivor of childhood sexual abuse. When it was founded, the group focused on abuse by religious figures, but has since expanded to support all victims of sexual abuse, she said. The organization is calling for either Murray’s resignation or the city council’s removal of him from office.” Network of Sexual Abuse Survivors Calls for Mayor Ed Murray’s Resignation (by Heidi Groover for The Stranger)

Democratic Politics

“The optics here are not good — especially given the attacks on Hillary Clinton, Kirsten Gillibrand, and even Elizabeth Warren just for endorsing Clinton during the last cycle. Cooper assures us that racism and misogyny play no role, and that to assert they do is just a cynical attempt by centrists “to win dirty.” But if racism and misogyny play no role, then why is it only men of color and women who come up for this sort of scrutiny?” “Sanders Democrats” Don’t Own the Left (By Melissa McEwan for Shakesville)

“On Monday, Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-N.M.), the DCCC chariman, told The Hill that financial support would not necessarily be withheld from anti-abortion candidates. As Lujan said, “there is not a litmus test for Democratic candidates. As we look at candidates across the country, you need to make sure you have candidates that fit the district, that can win in these districts across America.” Some found this position strange, while others saw it as unacceptable.” Here’s How Men Reacted When This Woman Asked Them If They’d Give Up Their Civil Rights (by Almie Rose for ATTN)

“I relate to the flailing panic that is no doubt undergirding such a morally putrescent idea. Nineteen hyenas and a broken vacuum cleaner control the White House, and ice is becoming extinct. I get it. I am desperate and afraid as well. I am prepared to make leviathan compromises to pull us back from that brink. But there is no recognizable version of the Democratic Party that does not fight unequivocally against half its constituents’ being stripped of ownership of their own bodies and lives. This issue represents everything Democrats purport to stand for. To legislatively oppose abortion is to be, at best, indifferent to the disenfranchisement, suffering and possibly even the death of women. At worst it is to revel in those things, to believe them fundamental to the natural order. Where, exactly, on that spectrum is Luján comfortable placing his party?” Of Course Abortion Should Be a Litmus Test for Democrats (by Lindy West for The New York Times)

Sunday

30

July 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – July 30, 2017

Written by , Posted in What I'm Reading

Fight Back

“Hirono said her colleagues on both sides of the aisle sent her comforting notes after her diagnosis about their own experiences with major illnesses. “You showed me your care. You showed me your compassion. Where is that tonight?” she said as she hit her fist on the desk. “I can’t believe that a single senator in this body has not faced an illness ― or whose family member or loved one has not faced illness ― where they were so grateful they had health care.”” Sen. Mazie Hirono Holds Back Tears During Impassioned Health Care Plea (by Rebecca Shapiro for Huffpost) (Please watch the video. It’s less than five minutes long and it’s so powerful.)

“In a letter to the Seattle City Council, the ACLU urged the City to adopt clear and binding guidelines around what data smart meters collect, who accesses the data, what the data can and cannot be used for, and what informed consent must be given before the meters are deployed. The ACLU points out that the option to opt-out offered by the City currently is inadequate, meaningless, and expensive. Under the City’s plan, third parties will be accessing this sensitive data, and those third parties should be bound not to sell the data or use it for unrelated purposes.” Seattle’s Smart Meter Project Lacks Protections for Privacy (ACLU)

Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary Actions

“If this bill were to become law, trans people would have no legal protections from discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, or health care. That’s really scary. Because while, in theory, Congress could just go, “Okay, sure, let’s amend each of our various civil rights bills to explicitly protect LGBTQ people,” they won’t (see: my bit above about the struggles Democrats have had trying to pass ENDA/the Equality Act — it’s just not a current political reality).” What you should know about that really nasty anti-trans bill in Congress. (by Parker Molloy for Medium)

“Indeed, in the last six months, Kelly has turned the DHS into one of the most productive arms of the Trump administration. Kelly managed to translate much of Trump’s brazen anti-immigrant campaign rhetoric into actual policy. And if the numbers are any indication, Kelly has certainly flourished. Arrests since Trump took office in February increased by 40 percent over the prior year. But perhaps more important than the numbers is Kelly’s impact on immigrant communities, where apprehension and fear now reign.” John Kelly’s Promotion Is a Disaster for Immigrants (by Julianne Hing for The Nation)

Reproductive Health

“The measure would allow abortion in cases of rape, if the mother’s life was at risk or if the foetus would not survive the pregnancy. Currently, women can be prosecuted if they have an abortion. The bill, which has the backing of President Michelle Bachelet, will now go back to the Chamber of Deputies for approval.” Chile moves towards legalising abortion in limited cases (BBC)

Transphobia

“Two of the clinics found to be violating city law have religious affiliations. The Addicts Rehabilitation Center was founded by a church, operates a gospel choir as one of its programs, and is currently run by Rev. Reginald Williams, a baptist preacher. The Center’s splash page proclaims, “We believe that if you discover the wonderful person the Creator has given to you, that nothing in this life can stop you from reaching your fullest potential.” The Salvation Army is itself a church with a long history of discriminating against LGBTQ people. While that history has mostly focused on its rejection of homosexuality, a Salvation Army-run homeless shelter in Texas was also accused of anti-transgender discrimination in 2014. Their public relations campaign to improve their LGBTQ image has rung rather hollow.” Salvation Army among New York City drug clinics rejecting transgender people (by Zack Ford for Think Progress)

Racism

“In the week since HBO’s July 19 announcement, concern — led by black activists, writers and other thought leaders — has mounted over the project’s premise and the pedigrees of its creators. At the Television Critics Association press tour on Wednesday, HBO programming president Casey Bloys expressed hope that viewers would “judge the actual material versus what it might be.” But while many of the industry’s screenwriters and critics have been hesitant to (publicly) weigh in based on the high concept alone, the nascent series already is facing a number of challenging issues. “What makes the premise fundamentally problematic is that it threatens to erase the actual history,” activist and artist Bree Newsome, who made headlines in 2015 when she was arrested for removing the Confederate flag from the South Carolina statehouse, tells The Hollywood Reporter.” HBO’s Slavery Drama ‘Confederate’ Faces Minefield of “Fundamentally Problematic” Issues (by Rebecca Sun for The Hollywood Reporter)

Criminal Punishment System

“President Donald Trump gave a speech at a Long Island community college on Friday during which he encouraged the use of violence. Turns out the audience was comprised of officers in a police department that has been scrutinized for racial profiling, and whose former chief was recently sentenced to prison for beating a man. The Suffolk County Police Department (SCPD) has been under federal oversight by the US Department of Justice since 2013, following a two-year investigation into allegations of discrimination against Latinos and immigrants. Nearly 20 percent of the county’s 1.5 million residents are Latino.” The Police Department Cheering On Trump’s Call for Excessive Force Is Already Under Federal Oversight for Discrimination (by Brandon Ellington Patterson for Mother Jones)

“Around midnight on July 16, a cop—whether local, state, or federal was unclear—apparently posing as an Uber driver arrested a man near the intersection of Havemeyer Avenue and South 2nd Street in Williamsburg. The suspect was cuffed before being placed in the back of a car bearing the ride-sharing company’s insignia, according to a colleague of mine who witnessed the arrest and provided the photo. At first blush, this certainly seems odd—or “unusual,” as Jacqueline Ross, a law professor at the University of Illinois who’s studied police practices across the globe, put it. She said it’s more typical for cops to go undercover as an employee of a made-up business, though there’s no law she is aware of preventing an officer from posing as someone who works for an established—a.k.a. real—private entity.” Are Cops Posing as Uber Drivers Now? (by Allie Conti for Vice)

Sports

“John Urschel, an offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens who received much publicity for his off-season pursuit of a doctorate in math at M.I.T., told the team on Thursday that he was hanging up his cleats at 26. Urschel’s agent, Jim Ivler, said Urschel was overwhelmed with interview requests but would not be speaking to the news media. On Twitter, Urschel wrote that “there is no big story here” and that the decision to retire was not an easy one to make, but “it was the right one for me.”” For Ravens’ John Urschel, Playing in the N.F.L. No Longer Adds Up (by Ken Belson for New York Times)

“The NFL reportedly objected to the fact that Dr. Robert Stern, the director of clinical research at the BU CTE Center, was leading the study, because he has always been very publicly critical of how the NFL has handled concussions. Outside the Lines found that the NFL instead steered its funds to doctors who currently or previously worked closely with the league. (The NIH ended up donating the funds for the study by itself; the NFL denied that it ever attempted to restrict the NIH funds.)” NFL ends concussion research partnership $16 million short of $30 million commitment (by Lindsay Gibbs for Think Progress)

Something Good

Sunday

16

July 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – July 16, 2017

Written by , Posted in What I'm Reading

Fight Back

“But Nikkita has run a surprising campaign in spite of the lack of respect from mainstream press. Her campaign launch party had lines around the block as hundreds of Seattleites of all races, genders, sexual orientations, and classes showed up excited for a truly progressive candidate. Her supporters are strong and growing. It has been a tough race, but Nikkita is not giving up.” When A Changemaker Runs For Mayor: An Interview With Nikkita Oliver (by Ijeoma Oluo for The Establishment)

“The action began at North Seattle College where community members gathered with their signs, flowers, and sacred items to prepare and discuss the agenda for the day. Before marching, participants gathered for a prayer lead by Sweetwater Nannauck of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian tribes of Southeast Alaska. From there marchers, led by a banner made by Nannuack that read “Justice 4 Charleena #SheCalledForHelp #TheyShotHer,” marched to the North Precinct and created an altar in honor of Charleena Lyles and all the people killed by the police in King County. A protective shield from possible violence by the police or aggressors was formed, mostly by White allies who linked arms and surrounded the queer, transgender, bisexual, people of color (QTBIPOC) creating the altar.” No Justice? No Celebration. Community Members Participate in Direct Action at SPD Community Picnic (by DJ Martinez for South Sound Emerald)

Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary Action

“The elimination of two years of funding for the five-year projects shocked the professors and community health officials around the country who run them. Health officials say cutting off money midway through multiyear research projects is highly unusual and wasteful because it means there can be no scientifically valid findings. The researchers will not have the funds to analyze data they have spent the past two years collecting or incorporate their findings into assistance for teens and their families.” Trump administration suddenly pulls plug on teen pregnancy programs (by  Jane Kay for Reveal)

“The drop in turnout in these six states led to 400,000 fewer votes relative to turnout in states where ID laws did not change. In Mississippi, Virginia, and Wisconsin, strict voter-ID laws had an especially pronounced negative impact on African-American voters.”  Wisconsin’s Voter-ID Law Suppressed 200,000 Votes in 2016 (Trump Won by 22,748) (by Ari Berman for The Nation)

Racism

“This rhetoric is yet another example of how white men are constantly and conveniently positioned as children whenever they mess up. We’ve seen it with Ryan Lochte, and even more recently with former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick. Grown men, given the benefit of the doubt in situations where others would most certainly be dragged. Yes, Trump Jr. is experiencing his fair share of (deserved) scrutiny over this incident, but the very fact that people including the president of the United States are defending him by using the word “kid” is still incredibly significant.” Can We Stop Calling Grown White Men ‘Kids’? (by Zeba Blay for Huffington Post)

Police Violence

“Lyles told the court Camphor had been violent for at least four years out of the eight years they had been together and was known to punch holes in walls, even hitting her while she was pregnant. “I feel so scared for my safety, and I just got out of the hospital from having our 6-days-old baby boy, and I had a c-section. I think he ripped my stitches open,” she wrote in her June 2nd petition for an order for protection. She ended by noting that she “didn’t see him changing.” She asked the court for help.” Who was Charleena Lyles? Family, court records paint picture (by Lilly Fowler for Crosscut)

“Data from 2017 show that armed white males are the category of people killed the most by police officers, a continuing trend over the past two years. However, black males are killed at disproportionately higher rates. While black men account for only 6% of the U.S. population, they make up about a quarter of police shooting victims. According to Mapping Police Violence, a database that tracks the number of black people killed by police officers, blacks are three times more likely to be fatally shot by officers than white people. The Post’s police shooting database shows that the number of black men killed by police has been declining — 50 were killed in the first half of 2015, 34 in the same period in 2016 and 27 so far this year.” Learn The Stomach-Turning Numbers Behind America’s Police Violence (by Celisa Calacal for The Establishment)

Health Care

“The case for doctor-assisted suicide — or “aid in dying,” as it is sometimes referred to— is perhaps most convincing when applied to those who are terminally ill. But the choice to end one’s life is decidedly more fraught in other situations.
Sandra Bem, a prominent feminist and professor at Cornell University, made the news with her own suicide in 2014. She wasn’t terminally ill in accordance with the general standards of current right-to-die legislation, but she had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. She wrote extensively about her wish to end her own life before she lost the ability to decide for herself.” Who Decides Who Gets To Die With Dignity? (by Katelyn Burns for The Establishment)

Misogyny

“The iconic pin-up artist Gil Elvgren, for example, often slimmed his subjects’ waists and expanded their chests and hips to conform to a 1950s hourglass silhouette. Before now, casual mainstream consumers had no way of knowing the lengths he went to to preserve this exclusive view of feminine sensuality, but a new series of photographs released by Nerve.com showcases the real-life models behind the famous images. These charming snapshots, when transformed into marketing images, are indeed snipped and sculpted to unrealistic and cartoonish shapes. Of course that’s the artist’s personal aesthetic, but we should nonetheless consume media, especially ad images, with a critical eye. Take a look.” The Real Women Behind Your Favorite Pin-Ups Looked A Little Less Photoshopped (by Brenda Pitt for Bust)

“The league’s salary cap is $315,000. What this means is that if one person out of the NWSL minimum 18-player club makes $41,700 for the season, there will be $273,300 left to pay the other 17 players on the team or about $16,076 per player for the season. That’s the league minimum of $15,000 plus an equal portion of what remains of the cap ($1,076). It would be nearly impossible for any club in the league to keep 17 players around at $16,076 while a single player on their roster is making $41,700. Not when salaries can’t happen in a vacuum.” The NWSL Salary Maximum Is A Lie (by RJ Allen for Backline Soccer)

Something Fun

Sunday

9

July 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – July 9, 2017

Written by , Posted in What I'm Reading

Racism

“Last week, Variety reported that Kim and his co-star Grace Park would be departing the CBS procedural ahead of its eighth season, due to a dispute with CBS Television Studios to reach pay equality with co-stars Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan. Insiders said Kim and Park’s final offer from the studio was 10-15% less than O’Loughlin and Caan, who each also each have lucrative back end deals on the show. Since the announcement of the duo’s departure, fans have been critical of CBS’s failure to reach parity with the series’ two Asian actors, while keeping two Caucasian stars on the show. The social media chatter comes after critics have targeted CBS for its lack of diverse leading roles for women and actors of color, in comparison to the other broadcast networks.” Daniel Dae Kim Breaks Silence After ‘Hawaii Five-0’ Pay Dispute: ‘The Path to Equality Is Rarely Easy’ (by Elizabeth Wagmeister for Variety)

Misogyny

“However, it soon became apparent that this promising start would not last for long. For my first few pull requests, I was getting feedback from literally dozens of engineers (all of whom were male) on other teams, nitpicking the code I had written. One PR actually had over 200 comments from 24 different individuals. It got to the point where the VP of engineering had to intervene to get people to back off. I thought that maybe because I was a well-known Rubyist, other engineers were particularly interested in seeing the kind of code I was writing. So I asked Aaron Patterson, another famous Rubyist who had started at GitHub at the same time as I did, if he was experiencing a lot of scrutiny too. He said he was not.” Antisocial Coding: My Year At GitHub (by Coraline Ada Ehmke)

Responsibility

“As a writer and a member of the founding team of a publisher—the one where you’re reading these words—committed not only to good, honest writing and journalism, but also committed to celebrating and amplifying the voices of marginalized communities, the responsibility for what we publish is something I take very seriously.” When Your Words Are Weapons (by Ijeoma Olua for The Establishment)

Local Politics

“Though she envisioned her political career playing a role to help elect others, Oliver soon found herself as the candidate. In November 2016, she was part of a group of friends and clergy who travelled to Standing Rock. On the return trip, a friend died in a car accident. Oliver and a group of community organizers in central and south Seattle found themselves grieving, grappling with the election of Trump and reflecting on the injustices they’d just witnessed at Standing Rock. It was so glaringly apparent that the law and justice are not the same thing as you watched law enforcement openly protect corporations that were drilling on land that at that time, they had absolutely no permits to drill on,” she explained to Jezebel in May.” A Conversation With Nikkita Oliver, the Seattle Mayoral Candidate Whose Activism Spawned a Movement (by Kara Brown for Jezebel)

Sunday

2

July 2017

0

COMMENTS

What I’m Reading – July 2, 2017

Written by , Posted in Feminism, Politics, What I'm Reading

Horrific Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary Action

“Nevertheless, the Texas Supreme Court held on Friday that the benefits of marriage may not need to be granted to same-sex couples on the same terms and conditions as opposite-sex couples. And the Texas court reached this frivolous conclusion in an unanimous opinion.” The Texas Supreme Court just gave a big, fat middle finger to same-sex couples (by Ian Millhiser for Think Progress)

“The all-girl team representing Afghanistan hails from Herat, a city of half a million people in the western part of the country. To interview for their visas, the girls risked a 500 mile trek cross-country to the American embassy in Kabul – the site of several recent suicide attacks and one deadly truck bomb in early June that killed at least 90 people. Despite the recent violence, the teenagers braved the trip to the country’s capital not once, but twice, hoping a second round of interviews might help secure their 7-day visas after the team was rejected on its first try. But no luck.” Denied: Afghanistan’s All-Girl Robotics Team Can’t Get Visas To The US (by Hilary Brueck for Forbes)

Speech

“The law does not share that interpretation. “The First Amendment only regulates the government,” explained Rebecca Tushnet, a professor of First Amendment law at Harvard. Does she think there is any merit in telling a person that her critique of your art is infringing on your free speech? “No.” It’s been a surprisingly effective rhetorical strategy nonetheless. Americans are fiercely proud of our culture of (nearly) unfettered expression, though often not so clear on the actual parameters of the First Amendment. To defend speech is to plant a flag on the right side of history; to defend unpopular speech is to be a real rogue, a sophisticate, the kind of guy who gets it. “Freedom of speech is such a buzzword that people can rally around,” Ms. Sarkeesian said, “and that works really well in their favor. They’re weaponizing free speech to maintain their cultural dominance.”” Save Free Speech From Trolls (by Lindy West for The New York Times)

Misogyny

“The event, called Gaming Ladies, was intended to create a safe space for female game developers, a demographic that’s woefully underrepresented in the gaming world. In response, a small, vitriolic group plotted on the forum ForoCoches (an invite-only car forum that’s basically a Spanish-language 4chan) to pretend to be transgender women in order to gain access to the conference and disrupt it.” King’s Gaming Ladies event canceled following targeted online harassment campaign (by Tim Mulkerin for Mic)

“Their presence was plainly not, as one of them later said in an “apology” video he posted to Twitter, to “give us the chance we never gave them” and to “hear us out,” but was instead to intimidate me and put me on edge. They will no doubt plead innocent and act shocked at what they characterize as the outrageousness of such allegations. This, too, is part of their strategy: gaslighting, acting in a way intended to encourage me and their other targets to doubt ourselves and to wonder if all of this isn’t just in our heads. But to anyone who examines their patterns of behavior with clear eyes, the intentions of their actions are undeniably apparent.” On VidCon, Harassment & Garbage Humans (by Anita Sarkeesian for Feminist Frequency)

Racism

“A longtime symphony fan, Ahmad knows the orchestra doesn’t permit flash photography during its performances, so she turned her flash off to snap a shot before the show started. “I was shocked,” she said. “I just very calmly said to him, ‘You cannot hit me. That’s assault. If you hit me again, I will charge you.’ At that point he called me a child and an expletive, and it was just very stunning. I won’t repeat the word.”” Professor says she was assaulted twice at the Toronto symphony and nobody stood up for her (by the CBC)

Criminal Punishment System

“Violence against People of Color (POC), gender and sexual violence against Womxn of Color (WOC) and Queer Trans People of Color (QTPOC), is endemic and systemic. It is colonial, centuries-old, poured into the very foundation of this nation. It keeps the status quo intact; upholding cis male patriarchy and white supremacy by brutalizing the marginalized into submission. Violence is the norm and it has been happening for a long time. If you’re surprised by recent tragic events–then you’re not paying attention but, more importantly, you have the privilege to not pay attention. Ask yourself, why did I not see? What in the world around allows me to not see? What in myself allows me to not see?” 9 Ways Non-Black Folks Can Show Up For Charleena Lyles (by Sharon H. Change for South Sound Emerald)

Fatphobia

“When we returned for our sophomore year, she told me the pressure had become too much. She feared for her partners’ shame, feared for more bullying from her tough love parents, feared for the jeering her thinner friends had to endure when they spent time with her. So she got weight loss surgery. I told her I was happy for her, and I was. She’d made a decision about how to engage with her own body. We’d often talked about how often our bodies were taken from us — from unsolicited diet advice to fatcalling, unwelcome comments about our orders at restaurants to bullying in the name of “concern.” Thinness was the only way she could truly end all of that.” On Weight Loss Surgery And The Unbearable Thinness Of Being (by Your Fat Friend for The Establishment)

Sexism

“However, Gail Simone, whose Wonder Woman comics from 2008 to 2010 inspired several facets of the film, noted on Twitter that her name did not appear among other thanked creators in the credits. That list was, in fact, entirely male, leaving out other influential creators, such as series editor Karen Berger. And while “The Marston Family” is listed, William Moulton Marston’s partners Elizabeth Marston and Olive Byrne—two women who played integral roles in the character’s inception—are not named, nor is Marston’s assistant and longtime Wonder Woman ghostwriter Joye Hummel Murchison. This isn’t to say men weren’t snubbed too (H.G. Peter, another of Marston’s co-creators, remains uncredited), but it’s hard not raise an eyebrow when two men who created a sword are given credit instead of any woman who worked on the world’s most famous female superhero.” ‘Wonder Woman’s’ Credits Reveal the Sexist Mistreatment of Women in Comics (by Sam Riedel for Bitch)

Something Awesome to End The Week