ASK Musings

No matter where you go, there you are.

Wednesday

23

March 2022

0

COMMENTS

The Darkness by Ragnar Jónasson

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Fans of Icelandic mysteries. People who don’t want to be totally in the dark but still want to be surprised.

In a nutshell:
Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir is widowed and closing in on retirement. Early on she receives some surprising bad news, and is given the OK to look into a cold case.

Worth quoting:
N/A

Why I chose it:
I loved the Dark Iceland series. This is an unrelated trilogy by the same author so obviously I had to get it. Bonus: the main character is a woman in her 60s – how often do we get that?

Review:
Hermannsdóttir is clearly a complicated woman. She’s a widow, works as a Detective Inspector, lives alone, and is closing in on retirement. When she finds out her retirement has been moved up, she decides to look into a closed case that she suspects wasn’t correctly solved. Asylum seeker Elena was found dead and one of Hermannsdóttir’s colleagues ruled it a suicide. Hermannsdóttir disagrees.

The book follows her exploration of this possible crime, but also her investigation into another one – a man suspected of pedophilia who was hit by a car, possibly intentionally. At the same time, Hermannsdóttir is considering pursuing a new relationship, the first since her husband’s death many years prior. There’s a lot going on here.

I’m not going to go into a lot more detail so I don’t spoil things, but as usual, Jónasson paints a very good picture. This book reads a bit like Arnaldur Indriðason’s books, in that there are what might potentially be related stories woven throughout, and the reader isn’t entirely sure who is being discussed in those chapters. I love that style of writing.

One thing I do appreciate about this book is the exploration of Hermannsdóttir’s career, and how being a woman in a profession full of men has been held back, her male bosses keeping her from moving up the ranks as quickly as lesser qualified men. It’s frustrating to read but good to see discussed in a novel (especially one written by a man). I’m looking forward to reading the second book (it’s a trilogy!), which I may have already purchased.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Donate It

Monday

21

March 2022

0

COMMENTS

Breathtaking by Rachel Clarke

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Anyone interested in a health care worker’s perspective on the first couple of months of COVID-19. Anyone who just wants to feel a little more rage at government failure.

In a nutshell:
Hospice physician and author Clarke shares her experiences – and experiences of patients and their families – during the first few weeks of COVID in England.

Worth quoting:
“In a major trauma, it is effective logistics, more than anything else, that saves lives.”

“It is abundantly clear that our patients were no one’s priority. No one in power had properly considered them.”

“Those residents — the very old, the very sick and people with disabilities — are precisely the population most at risk of dying from COVID. Yet far from being cocooned, as the government promised they would be, they are being incarcerated with COVID.”

Why I chose it:
I used to work in Public Health emergency management in the US. We had plans, though they relied on the federal government to have their shit together. Watching the UK national government, led by wildly inept elected officials, flounder and fail repeatedly, I am interested in learning as much as I can about exactly why and how they could have failed so dramatically, in the hopes that they don’t fuck up the response to the next pandemic.

Review:
As I type this in March 2022, two years and a couple of days after the government finally said maybe people should, like work from home for a bit if they can, there are zero restrictions related to COVID in the UK. I don’t even think we have to stay home if we test positive. I mean, they’d like us to, but not needed. Tests are free (like the only thing this government did right), but that ends at the end of March too. Masks are recommended on transit, but even that’s not required. You could also get on a plane and come here without proof of a negative test. Hospitalizations are on the rise, cases are higher than ever even with fewer people testing. It’s not a good look. But it’s not surprising because, in case you couldn’t tell from the first parts of my review, I think that England has royally fucked up the entire response to this disease.

I think Clarke agrees with me, at least regarding the parts that are in her purview. She kept a diary of the first few weeks of COVID in England, and this book is a compilation of that, experiences of some people who survived COVID, family members of those who did not, and people who were impacted health-wise in other ways; e.g. having to delay or defer treatment for other deadly illnesses like cancer.

England locked down too late, and at one point accounted for something like 10% of COVID deaths despite having less than 1% of the world population. And part of that is because of how England treated people who were in care homes. The staff in those facilities weren’t treated like proper health care employees, and so didn’t get the PPE they needed. At the same time, people were discharged from hospitals to care homes without COVID tests, so COVID was basically forced into these care facilities. It’s disgusting and should be a national disgrace; instead the government is still boasting about their world-beating whatever.

Not that I imagine you need it, but the book provides such a human face to what turned into statistics, especially for those of us like me who so far have been lucky enough to both avoid getting COVID and avoid any of my friends or family getting seriously ill from it. We learn of the experience of someone who had to be intubated, and also the discussions that took place within hospice and when people were definitely dying. It’s not an easy read, but it is a book I couldn’t put down. It gives me hope in the sense that individuals are determined and care so much, but it makes me despair at how utterly so many of the people elected to serve us have failed.

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Sunday

27

February 2022

0

COMMENTS

Winterkill by Ragnar Jónasson

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Fans of Icelandic crime fiction.

In a nutshell:
A young woman is found dead on a sidewalk, apparently having jumped from the balcony of a home. Or did she?

Worth quoting:
N/A. I just raced through the book.

Why I chose it:
Four years ago I picked up the first in the Dark Iceland series at the Iceland Airport. I immediately tracked down the rest of the books, and then read what I thought was the final (fifth) book. In a bookstore this weekend, I wandered over to the J section in Crime and saw there was a sixth!

Review:
I enjoy these books. They aren’t formulaic but they aren’t totally absurd either. Yes, there are often twists, and sometimes they are ones that I didn’t see coming, but also that are specific enough that it might be hard for anyone to see coming. That said, I always find them interesting.

Ari has gone from a new officer in the first book to the Inspector in charge of police in the town in the final one. We’ve followed his relationships and the birth of his son. He’s not the most complicated person, but he is interesting enough. The star of these books, however, is the way Jónasson writes about small town Iceland. Even in the spring, there’s a sense of claustrophobia, but not in a bad way. The people are mostly pretty typical, but they also all know each other, which makes keeping secrets a bit of challenge. Things are connected, and not always in the ways a reader might predict.

In this particular book, there are a couple of different storylines, which may or may not be related. Plus, Ari’s ex is visiting with his son, so there’s a slight romance angle as well. I believe this is now the final book in this series, as he Jónasson has moved on to create a new series (the first two books I’ve also recently procured). It’s a decent enough wrap-up to the books, and I’m glad I got another chance to see how Ari would handle a case.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Donate it

Tuesday

22

February 2022

0

COMMENTS

Abolitionist Socialist Feminism by Zillah Eisenstein

Written by , Posted in Abolition, Politics, Reviews

Three Stars

Best for:
I’m not sure who the target audience of this book is. I’d think it’d be someone like me, but it didn’t work for me.

In a nutshell:
A series of essays. I really can’t describe it as I’m not quite sure what I just read.

Worth quoting:
“Suffering is more than economic and will remain grossly unequal as long as it is dealt with in this partial fashion.”

“There is no one kind of feminism, although it is often represented as though there were, and that one is too often assumed to be white, western-hetero, and liberal or neoliberal.”

Why I chose it:
I saw it in a bookshop and thought it looked interesting.

Review:
This is referred to as a book, but it feels more like a loose collection of essays. And despite the title, discussions of abolition and socialism do not come up as often as I would like.

Eisenstein has some interesting thoughts to share, but each essay (or chapter) is both too long and too short. They feel a bit too long because I’m not sure what the main thesis is for some – they end up being a bit disorganized for my taste, though each feels very similar, so I think it is more the author’s style as opposed to being bad writing, if that makes sense. Basically, I think it will work for lots of people but it just doesn’t work for me. And too short because I think there is more to each topic to be explored, but they don’t quite get there for me.

One part I appreciate, and something I think some popular socialist movements in recent times have not gotten right, is that she makes it very clear that the problems of society won’t be solved if we just address economic inequality. Racism, misogyny, anti-gay, anti-trans, and ableism are all intertwined.

I think this book might work if each of the essays were sort of an intro or jumping off point for going into deeper study and discussion of the main topic. But as a collection it just wasn’t for me.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Donate it

Saturday

19

February 2022

0

COMMENTS

Overtime by Will Stronge & Kyle Lewis

Written by , Posted in Uncategorized

Four Stars

Best for:
Workers.

In a nutshell:
Stronge and Lewis make a simple, elegant, and frankly pretty difficult to refute case for shortening the work week to four days or fewer.

Worth quoting:
[B]eing able to relax, spend time with loved ones, pursue self-directed activity and have freedom from a boss are all essential parts of what it means to be human. Time is life after all.”

Why I chose it:
Verso books had a sale 😀

Review:
When I really think about it, is is pretty absurd that as a society we’ve just sort of … accepted that we work five days (on average) and then get two days ‘off.’ Like, why on earth should someone else get to dictate what I do for more than 2/3 of my life? That’s so bizarre. And this is way better than before, where people maybe got Sundays off? Maybe? I know there are many people who work shifts and multiple jobs where they either don’t get two days off in a row, or those two days change regularly depending on schedules, but for many people, they work at least 40 hours spread across five days out of seven.

Seriously. That’s ridiculous.

Authors Stronge and Lewis lay out their argument in such a straightforward way. They provide a brief background of labor struggles for better working conditions, and capitalism’s obsession with productivity and growth. They also point out that any version of the world that comes after capitalism can’t just focus on who owns the means of production, but on the quality — and quantity — of the time workers are on the job. They then spend one chapter each on three main arguments: that shorter working hours are good for people to flourish; that shorter working hours honor the time of those who perform unpaid labor (usually women); and that shorter working week is better for the environment.

On the first point, it seems pretty obvious. The authors discuss how many people talk about art and other similar ‘leisure’ pursuits as frivolous and the domain of the wealthy, but they point out that this is because the rich are the ones who can afford to do that. Think about how much art — poetry, music, books, plays, everything — we’ve missed out on because someone who might have created wonderful art instead had to spend so much of their time ‘earning a living.’

(Also, yikes. That phrase is disturbing. No one should have to ‘earn’ a living. We all deserve to live.)

On the second point, the authors discuss how a shorter working week would allow for greater division of unpaid work in homes with men and women in them. So much of office working life is based on an old assumption that the workers would be men who would have women at home doing all things domestic. Many women have always worked, and yet whether working or not, women in a home with men and women still end up doing more of the care-taking labor. With a shorter work week, in a two-person home, they would have six free days each week instead of four. And those working more labor-intensive jobs already would also have more time to relax and recover.

Finally, the third point looks at how fewer working days can have a positive impact on the environment. In obvious ways like cutting commuting, but also in ways like reduced purchase of things like grab and go sandwiches at work or ready meals each evening because we’re all so overworked. I liked this argument as well because they focus a bit on different green new deals that have been put forward, and how if they don’t include a reduction in working weeks they aren’t doing all they can for the environment.

In the UK, there is a movement to try out four-day work weeks. My own partner has one, but he took a 20% pay cut for it; the broader movement suggests instead that we should be working fewer hours but for the same pay.

I don’t know if this is possible to achieve. But I think it is something that should be much higher up on the list of things workers are fighting for than it currently is.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Keep

Wednesday

16

February 2022

0

COMMENTS

How to be Perfect by Michael Schur

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Fans of The Good Place. People who want to be better.

In a nutshell:
TV writer and Creator of The Good Place shares what he learned about moral philosophy during that show, breaking it down using funny analogies and stories.

(Note: My review may have some spoilers for The Good Place. If you’ve never seen the show, I suggest you fix that immediately.)

Worth quoting:
“[F]or a meritocracy to work — for a society to properly value and celebrate the hard work and individual success — the people within the society need to start from the same point of origin. Otherwise, the cream isn’t rising to the top — the people who were the closest to the top already are rising to the top, and the whole concept of meritocracy crumbles to dust.”

“For people deeply invested in the way things are, any change would mean confronting decisions they’ve made that created or sustained the troubling reality.”

“When we do something good, we want credit, dammit. We want a little gold star.”

Why I chose it:
The Good Place is 100% my favorite television show of all time. Like, it’s not even a competition. Part of that is because I studied moral philosophy in graduate school (I actually squealed when ‘What We Owe to Each Other’ showed up in an early episode, and ran to get my copy to show my partner) and part of that is because it’s forking hilarious while also being extremely thoughtful. When I saw this book, I knew I had to order it and read it immediately.

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Review:
What a book. What a delightful, optimistic, educational, funny book.

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Alright, so Michael Schur, who created a Good Place that I really hope exists, has taken what he learned about philosophy from that experience and written an interesting and easy to understand book about moral philosophy and ethics. It is a VERY fun read, which is impressive, since it covers virtue ethics (Aristotle), deontology (Kant), utilitarianism (Mill and Bentham), Consequentialism (Scanlon), and Existentialism (Sartre and Camus).

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Plus it includes some nice, deep burns of Ayn Rand. Those are always welcomed.

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Schur starts with the easier stuff (“Should I punch my friend in the face for no reason?”), introducing different concepts slowly, so the reader can get used to one and see how it applies in a situation. By the later chapters, when we’re dealing with more intense stuff (e.g. can you keep supporting a person or company that does bad things and also makes things you love, aka the Chic-fil-a Conundrum), he brings together multiple theories to see what they would say about the decisions we could make, and opines on why some options might be better than others.

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I especially appreciate his take on the ideas of what we owe to each other, because he talks extensively about how what we owe does depend on who we are and where we are in our lives. He has a running thread about a 27 cent tip on a $1.73 cup of coffee. He rightly points out that to someone who doesn’t have a lot of money, that 27 cents is generous. But for someone like him, who is extremely privileged and has a lot of money, he should be giving more. Doing more. He owes it to society. As do people with even more wealth and privilege than Schur like, say, Jeff Bezos.

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Obviously I loved this book, so why isn’t it 5 stars? Well, let’s get back to the Chic-fil-a Conundrum. Because part of the book — not a huge part, but definitely at least a chapter — is devoted to Peter Singer. Now, I have read some of Singer’s work in the past, and I found a pre-CBR review I wrote of one of his works that I obviously didn’t assess critically. I should have done my homework, because that guy is a mess. He’s definitely … consistent, but that consistency leads him to support eugenics. Dude is SUPER ableist, to a deeply disturbing degree. Which is a big bummer, because he also happens to have some interesting ideas about where we should target charitable giving.

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Schur references this a bit in a footnote (a footnote that comes in ten pages into the section on Singer), but basically makes it sound like he almost respects how hard Singer sticks to his beliefs even as they lead to some despicable outcomes (making Singer a pretty big failure from a virtue ethics perspective). Schur even suggests that people don’t like Singer because he makes us feel bad about our own actions. I mean sure, probably that factors in it a little. But mostly its the eugenics. And apparently Schur even wrote the introduction to one of Singer’s books? COME ON BUDDY. Like, I know it’s a bit meta, but writing a book about moral philosophy and choosing to include one of the more problematic living philosophers isn’t great. I’m sure there’s another philosopher he could have included for that section.

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Some other bits of note:
This book has a lot of footnotes and those footnotes are GEMS. I love a book that takes a moment to redirect the reader to a footnote, and that footnote says something like ‘Todd notes that Sartre would also say that addiction is a choice. Mike notes that Sartre needs to cool it a little.’

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I wish this book had been available to me before I started grad school because honestly, Schur described Kant and the categorical imperative in 10 pages better than many philosophy professors. Like, seriously, if I could go back and take my moral philosophy course exam again, I think I might crush it.

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Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Recommend to a Friend and Keep

Wednesday

9

February 2022

0

COMMENTS

The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Fan of claustrophobic fiction

In a nutshell:
In the 1600s in Norway, a sudden storm kills nearly all the men in the village of Vardø. A year later, a man is sent to govern the remaining women.

Worth quoting:
“But now she knows she was foolish to believe that evil existed only out there. It was here, among them, walking on two legs, passing judgment with a human tongue.”

Why I chose it:
It was in a subscription box and I hadn’t yet read it. Then my partner got it for me for my birthday (whoops) so I figured it was a sign to finally read it.

Review:
This is a story primarily about about young women growing up and trying to make their way in difficult circumstances. On the one hand there is Maren, a resident of the village who loses her father, brother, and fiancée in the storm. Her sister-in-law is Sámi, and is pregnant with Maren’s nephew. The women attempt to deal with having lost 40 men from their village, including the town minister. Some take it upon themselves to do things like fish (which is seen as absurd for a woman to do) and try to survive in this freezing land north of the Arctic Circle, while others lean deeper into their Christianity, judging others around them who are defying their ideas of what women should be.

On the other had there is Ursa. She is promised to Absalom, the man who has been identified as the one who will go up to Vardø to ‘take control’ of the situation. She knows nothing about Absalom before she has to get on a ship with him and travel north for a month. She is unprepared to be a wife, let alone a wife in such a challenging environment, but she and Maren become friends.

Then more things happen, which I won’t share because spoilers but yikes.

The writing is great. Author Millwood Hargrave manages to create such a descriptive environment. I could picture every scene so vividly. And, like some of the crime novels I love that are set in Iceland, she is able to make such an open place feel utterly claustrophobic. And the characters she’s created are well-defined and interesting. I want to learn more about all of them, even the most vile ones.

I was about 1/3 of the way through this book when I was listening to the humor podcast Wine and Crime. If you’re not familiar, three friends pick a theme each week and learn about the background and then share two real-world examples of crimes that fit the theme. A recent one was about a specific topic, which I knew because I listened to the whole starting bit with background on the topic. And then the first story they start telling is about 1617 Vardø, in Finnmark. I hit pause and double-checked and yup, they were about to talk about the historical incident that this book is based on. So I was spoiled, wish I hadn’t been, but it didn’t ruin the book at all.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Recommend to a Friend and Donate it

Sunday

23

January 2022

0

COMMENTS

Becoming Abolitionists by Derecka Purnell

Written by , Posted in Abolition, Reviews

Three Stars

Best for:
Those interested in one person’s journey to an abolitionist perspective. Those who are already or thinking of becoming abolitionists but looking for some answers to the tougher questions.

In a nutshell:
Organizer and lawyer Purnell shares her journey towards an abolitionist viewpoint.

Worth quoting:
“If we truly want to save lives in the US and beyond, we have to join in the traditions of activists who fight to end policing, wars and military operations across the globe.”

“It makes me wish that people were more curious than critical because it’s so much easier to learn that way.”

“Make policing obsolete by reducing the police, reducing the reasons why people need police, reducing the reasons why people think they need police, and building a society where we have just relationships to each other, to our labor, to our communities, and to our planet.”

“Policing was, and is, deeply connected to the control of land, labor, and people who threatened white supremacy.”

Why I chose it:
I follow Purnell on twitter, and this book seemed like one I would really enjoy.

Review:
Have you ever seen a movie, known it was good, heard people and critics raving about, but after watching it, just felt kind of meh about it? That’s how I feel about this book. I think it’s important, I think it’s well-written, I think the information is very helpful for any abolitionists. Yet it took me quite a long time to get through. But I think this is a case of ‘It’s not you, it’s me,’ because I do think this is likely a very good book.

Also, it was literally hard to read because the font choice was inexplicably bad. ‘Bulmer MT’ is the font, apparently. And it is SO TINY. I read a ton but this felt at times like I was attempting to read the ingredients on the side of a small jar of pasta sauce – I had to reread paragraphs because I literally couldn’t parse the words, which definitely slowed me down.

Alright, with all of those caveats, what about the actual content of this book? It’s good. Really good. There’s a lot of information, coupled with Purnell’s direct experiences, to make a strong case of police and prison abolition. I know that many people were exposed to the idea of defunding the police in summer 2020, but there are many activists and thinkers who have been promoting the idea of complete police and prison abolition for decades before, so there is a lot to learn. If you have questions, someone has thought about what the answers might be, and Purnell shares some of them here, along with her own thinking on matters.

If you’re at all interested in abolition and the history of policing and prisons, or if you’re interested in ways we can improve society, I think this is a good book to check out.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Keep it – there is a lot of good information here

Saturday

22

January 2022

0

COMMENTS

Fair Play by Tove Jansson

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Those looking for a mix between short stories and a novel.

In a nutshell:
Jonna and Mari are artists and friends who are in their 70s and live at opposite ends of an apartment building on an island.

Worth quoting:
“She’s not shy; she just won’t bother trying to be pleasant. She thinks it’s artistic to be gloomy.”

Why I chose it:
My partner gave this to me as a gift, I think because it’s a novel about friendship, not romantic love, and I wish there were more of those.

Review:
One of my favorite TV shows is Grace & Frankie. It’s not a perfect piece of art, but I love that women in their 70s are shown as complex people with their own wants and needs, not people who are shut off in a corner, watching everyone else live their lives. I don’t think we get enough of that in popular media – the exploration of friendship outside of, say, YA shows and books. Nearly everything revolves around romantic love, and while that can be interesting to me, I think the love of a friend is so interesting as well.

This book is a series of short chapters with no obvious through line. Yes, they probably should be read in order (I imagine the author had it in mind), but one chapter doesn’t necessarily follow from the next. Each has a title (similar to a short essay) as opposed to a number.

Jonna and Mari are both artists – Mari, I believe, writes and illustrates stories; Jonna works in other aspects of visual art (film, paint, etc.). They seem to be very important to each other’s creative processes, stopping in during the workday while also picking up on where the other is in their journey on a particular piece of art. They also have visitors, take trips, get stuck in storms. They clearly care deeply about each other, in a way that is so familiar that they know what to do next without discussion. It’s sweet and interesting.

They also aren’t perfect. Jonna can be a bit short, and Mari a bit passive-aggressive. Jonna strikes me as a bit more selfish, but not to a problematic degree. They are both independent and supportive of each other, and it’s lovely to read.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Keep it – I can see myself reading it again, especially as I get older.

Saturday

15

January 2022

0

COMMENTS

The Care Manifesto by The Care Collective

Written by , Posted in Reviews

Four Stars

Best for:
Those interested in a new way to think about society and community.

In a nutshell:
The Care Collective makes the case for a re-framing of our priorities, putting care at the top, and organizing society around that.

Worth quoting:
“The inherently careless practice of ‘growing the economy’ has taken priority over ensuring the well-being of citizens.”

“One of the great ironies surrounding care is that it is actually the rich who are most dependent on those they pay to service them in innumerable personal ways.”

“We must begin by recognising the myriad ways that our survival and our thriving are everywhere and always contingent on others.”

Why I chose it:
Verso books had a big sale. I might have bought a lot…

Review:
During the first UK lock down I joined a mutual aid WhatsApp group. I think the local council supported it with funds, but volunteers managed requests and then posted to the group to see who could fulfill them. Most required use of a car, which I didn’t have, but I was occasionally able to help out by printing a grocery gift certificate and home and then walking it over to a neighbor. When we were able to get a grocery delivery slot, we checked with our neighbor to see if they needed us to get them anything; we both shared extra food from produce boxes or extra things we had baked (our neighbor was a pastry chef, so I think we got the better end of that deal). I have friends with young kids who created ‘pods’ so they could spread the child caring responsibilities while also giving their children a way to socialize when they weren’t in-person in school.

I think for me and many others not raised in a culture of care and community, the pandemic has opened our eyes to what we can all do when we support each other, and how much better life is when we support and care for each other. This manifesto explores how much all of our lives could be improved by putting care at the center of our economy, government, and communities. It starts by making the case that we need to expand the idea of who is a carer in our life from immediate family to our friends and neighbors. Yes, some types of care (such as personal hygiene support) may require a close or intimate relationship, but many others just require being willing and supportive of our friends and neighbors.

In looking at the caring community, the authors argue for four main features. One is mutual support – so the types of things I mentioned at the start of this review. The second is public space – taking back green and other types of spaces that have been privatized and given to companies or private property owners. The third is shared resources – they discuss not just book libraries but other types of sharing systems like tool libraries or appliance shares (do you need a leaf blower every day, or can you perhaps borrow one a couple times a year?). And finally the last is local democracy – supporting the community at a local level based on what is needed.

I enjoyed reading this book as it got me thinking further about what our society really could be, and how deeply disappointing the concept of neoliberalism is, and how ridiculous capitalism is. We can do so much better.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Recommend to a Friend and Keep